wwnorton:

lastnightsreading:

Stephin Merritt at Barnes & Noble Union Square, 9/29/14

Merritt was there to talk 101 Two-Letter Words—his new book of short poems celebrating the 101 two-letter words allowed in Scrabble—with Roz Chast, who illustrated the book.
Not pictured: Stephin’s ukelele.
See Stephin’s full list tour dates. 

wwnorton:

lastnightsreading:

Stephin Merritt at Barnes & Noble Union Square, 9/29/14

Merritt was there to talk 101 Two-Letter Words—his new book of short poems celebrating the 101 two-letter words allowed in Scrabble—with Roz Chast, who illustrated the book.

Not pictured: Stephin’s ukelele.

See Stephin’s full list tour dates

see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 

(Source: matildaswormwood)

I haven’t read Kevin’s [DeYoung] book, so I can’t comment on it directly. I am familiar, though, with Kevin’s understanding of the nature of Scripture and his defense of it from his blog. I would surmise that Kevin’s defense of scripture parallels that of others who agree with him. The crux of my disagreement with him would be that the Bible he is defending is not really the Bible so much as it is a defense of a particular brand of inerrantist dogmatic theology that is I feel is foreign to the Bible. Equating that theology with the Bible itself runs into well known problems, and thus leads to the steady stream of books, essays, and even whole encyclopedias offering “defenses” of the Bible. This is geared toward protecting a dogmatic theology and the Bible as some would like it to be, but it actually gets in the way of understanding the Bible we have.

(Source: 90s90s90s)

Vagabond (1985) dir. Agnès Varda

(Source: thefilmfatale)

politicalprof:

kohenari:

Please, please, please let this become a thing on Facebook this week.
This would be so much more fun to watch go viral than people dumping cold water on themselves.
HT: Alan Benard.

Because when Jesus said “blessed are the Peacemakers,” he meant Colt .45s

In an apt metaphor for the Christian Right, a “patriot” holds a Bible hostage.

politicalprof:

kohenari:

Please, please, please let this become a thing on Facebook this week.

This would be so much more fun to watch go viral than people dumping cold water on themselves.

HT: Alan Benard.

Because when Jesus said “blessed are the Peacemakers,” he meant Colt .45s

In an apt metaphor for the Christian Right, a “patriot” holds a Bible hostage.

qwantzfeed:

me night, you scum.  NO WAIT: me goddamned batman, you dense or something

comics! patronage! merchandise!

(Source: lieutenant-columbo)

pbstv:

The Ebola outbreak may have been sparked by cutting down the West African rainforest. Now, Norway will pay Liberia to halt deforestation. The benefits for the African nation could extend well beyond public health.
More from NOVA Next.

pbstv:

The Ebola outbreak may have been sparked by cutting down the West African rainforest. Now, Norway will pay Liberia to halt deforestation. The benefits for the African nation could extend well beyond public health.

More from NOVA Next.

Midnight showing. Alone in the theater.

Midnight showing. Alone in the theater.